For accessibility and those with screen readers, follow this link and non-accessible navigation components will be deactivated.
 
Oct 20, 2017 - 03:38 PM  
Providing Information To Help Seniors & Their Caregivers Help Themselves
Join Our Email List Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon
Email:
Twitter Facebook Blogger

Get Adobe Acrobat Reader

| Leaders| | Medical| | Well-Being| | Resources|
| Past Leaders| | Past Medical| | Past Well-Being| | Past Resources|

Getting Your Affairs in Order

National Institutes on Aging

Ben has been married for 47 years. He always managed the family's money. But since his stroke, Ben can't walk or talk. His wife, Shirley, feels overwhelmed. Of course, she's worried about Ben's health. But on top of that, she has no idea what bills should be paid or when they are due.

Across town, 80-year-old Louise lives alone. One night, she fell in the kitchen and broke her hip. She spent a week in the hospital and 2 months in a rehabilitation nursing home. Even though her son lives across the country, he was able to pay her bills and handle her Medicare questions right away. That's because, several years ago, Louise and her son made a plan about what he should do in case Louise had a medical emergency.

Plan for the Future
No one ever plans to be sick or disabled. Yet, it's just this kind of planning that can make all the difference in an emergency. Long before she fell, Louise had put all her important papers in one place and told her son where to find them. She gave him the name of her lawyer as well as a list of people he could contact at her bank, doctor's office, insurance company, and investment firm. She made sure he had copies of her Medicare and other health insurance cards. She added her son's name to her checking account, allowing him to write checks from that account. His name is on her safe deposit box at the bank as well. Louise made sure Medicare and her doctor had written permission to talk with her son about her health and insurance claims.

On the other hand, Ben always took care of family money matters, and he never talked about the details with Shirley. No one but Ben knew that his life insurance policy was in a box in the closet or that the car title and deed to the house were filed in his desk drawer. Ben never expected that his wife would have to take over. His lack of planning has made a tough job even tougher for Shirley.

Steps for Getting Your Affairs in Order

  • Put your important papers and copies of legal documents in one place. You could set up a file, put everything in a desk or dresser drawer, or just list the information and location of papers in a notebook. If your papers are in a bank safe deposit box, keep copies in a file at home. Check each year to see if there's anything new to add.
  • Tell a trusted family member or friend where you put all your important papers. You don't need to tell this friend or family member about your personal affairs, but someone should know where you keep your papers in case of an emergency. If you don't have a relative or friend you trust, ask a lawyer to help.
  • Give consent in advance for your doctor or lawyer to talk with your caregiver as needed. There may be questions about your care, a bill, or a health insurance claim. Without your consent, your caregiver may not be able to get needed information. You can give your okay in advance to Medicare, a credit card company, your bank, or your doctor. You may need to sign and return a form.
". . . to read the entire article Please Click Here.






You will need the free Acrobat Reader to see this article.
To download it please click this logo.
Acrobat Reader Download

For more information please click on the following link to email us

- Return to the top of the page -

A Service of the Central Massachusetts Agency on Aging   
Hosting and support for this site is provided by Ashdown Technologies Inc. (http://www.ashdowntech.com) as a complimentary service to the central Massachusetts caregiving community.

Support for this site is provided in part or whole by the Massachusetts Executive Office of Elder Affairs
Copyright © 2017 CMAA